Blackthorne Farm Beef

Blackthorne Farm Beef

Follow our herd of Black Angus cattle through the seasons to see where your beef comes from and how it is raised.

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Blackthorne Farm Beef

Spring has sprung

4621Spring was kind to us this year. Pastures are coming on strong and the cattle are healthy and fat. The bull did his job over the winter and all of the ladies are pregnant.

We have several nice steers that will be ready for processing around the end of May so please contact us soon if you want to reserve some local grass fed/grass finished antibiotic free meat. Call Dave at 859-983-4289.

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Spring has sprung

Last calf of the fall and the arrival of Big Daddy

705

The last of the fall calves were born in November which signaled that it was time to introduce THE BULL to the herd. We pulled up to the pasture gate with a stock trailer. He sniffed the air and let out a long low groan. The cows were out of sight but came running as he sauntered out with appropriate swagger. It seems that a bull’s work is never done.

The warm fall weather has been kind to the pastures with abundant stockpiled fescue and clover available to both cows and calves that we are finishing for next year. We should have excellent beef next year. Place your orders early so we can be sure that you are included.

Our lean ground beef that we sold by the pound this summer was received enthusiastically by our client base. I wish we had more.

We wish all of you and your families a healthy and prosperous 2016!

 

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Last calf of the fall and the arrival of Big Daddy

How safe is your beef?

20150912_182021

The October 2015 issue of Consumer Reports contains an excellent cover article about meat safety. While it does not address the obvious nutritional benefits of grass fed beef it does speak to the relative safety of sustainable pasture raised animals like ours compared to feedlot beef sold in grocery stores. In summary:

“…Consumer Reports recommends that you buy sustainably raised beef whenever possible. …Aside from the animal welfare and environmental benefits, grass-fed cattle also need fewer antibiotics and other drugs to treat disease”

They conclude by saying:

“Sustainably raised beef does cost more …but it’s the safest-and most humane-way for Americans to enjoy our beloved burgers…cooked to medium of course.”

Amen.

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on How safe is your beef?

The boys and girls of summer

IMG_1838[1]

The dog days of summer combined with lots of rain have created lush pastures, ideal for fattening cattle. Quality homegrown clover and grass hay has been made for winter forage and is in the barn.

We are starting to process this year’s crop of two year olds for meat. We are offering lean grassfed ground beef by the pound as long as it lasts as well as sides and quarters. As usual are our beef has been raised on our farm and is totally grass fed and finished with no GMO grain input, growth hormones, antibiotics in feed, pesticides or herbicides.

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on The boys and girls of summer

First calves of spring

A spring in his step

A spring in his step

Our first calf of the season arrived today. It will take him about two years on good grass for him to reach maturity.

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on First calves of spring

With spring flowers come the bees

009013

Our new bees arrived to repopulate the hive that did not survive the winter. Charlie is the resident beekeeper, responsible for pollination of our clover pastures and wildflowers. The photographer was not wearing a bee suit and got stung. Charlie did not.

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on With spring flowers come the bees

A redhead moves in.

A calf of a different color.

A calf of a different color.

We got a phone call in the midst of the second 12″ snow in early March. A cow had died during the storm giving birth to a red angus heifer calf that was found covered with snow. The boys agreed to bottle feed her to try to save her. She has prospered and we turned her out with the herd yesterday. They will continue to bottle feed her for another month as her rumen begins to develop the capacity to digest grass. When she sees the boys she comes running.

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on A redhead moves in.

Another tough winter in Kentucky

February 2015

February 2015

Or should we say spring? Early spring 2015 was exciting to say the least. Record snow followed by record cold. Fortunately, with our high quality hay and stored body fat the cattle came out of the winter in great condition.

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Another tough winter in Kentucky

Winter Sunrise

Winter Rainbow

Winter Rainbow

As 2014 comes to a close, this scene greeted us as we headed out for morning chores and inspection of the cattle herd. We don’t often see a late December rainbow – this one seemed to say: “Stop a minute. Look around and take in all that nature has provided. Count your blessings.”

Winter has been mild, a blessing for both livestock and farmers alike. The cattle have thrived on rich grass and clover pastures through the summer. For the last few weeks they have dined on hay harvested on the farm and the neighboring farm. A fine crop of active, young calves are growing strongly with the younger ones still enjoying mother’s milk.

The rainbow promises another beautiful day. It seems a harbinger of many more fine days ahead and a preview of the coming spring.

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Winter Sunrise

Like children, young calves need to be vaccinated

Cowgirl Gin and Cowboy Dave round up a calf.

Cowgirl Gin and Cowboy Dave round up a calf.

Animal health is taken seriously at Blackthorne Farm despite questionable horsemanship. Because we run a closed herd we are able to avoid the “cloud of pathogens” at the stockyards. We perform basic vaccinations and monitor internal and external parasites.

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Like children, young calves need to be vaccinated